E-book publishing

The Washington Post has a great story about e-publishing — in particular, self e-publishing. It seems that when it pays off, it pays off big. It seems to be profitable for romance writers, who have a devoted readership anxious to read more. Backlists and thriller genre look promising too.

I may try my hand at it. The very things that are listed as cons (book jacket design, layout) are the kinds of things I like to do and these days, every author ends up marketing their book whether they have an agent or publisher or not.

One thing the article doesn’t mention about the appeal of e-books is that if you buy one and don’t like it, you’re only out of pocket a few bucks. I have had bookcases full of books I paid ten times as much for that I didn’t like at all. Add the portability factor to that (I’m heading off to France this fall and am now seriously considering purchasing my first Kindle so that I’m not hauling hard books around with me) and sales have nowhere to go but up.

Here’s a link to the full article. Definitely worth reading.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/novel-rejected-theres-an-e-book-gold-rush/2011/04/09/AFZdqb9F_story.html

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12 Responses to E-book publishing

  1. Thanks for sharing. I’ve really warmed up to the idea of self-publishing. It seems to hold a lot of advantages. It’s hard work, but it’s worth it if it’s done right.

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    • Peggy Blair says:

      I think it can be, Sonia. Once people have a better way of vetting self-published e-books (like good and reputable online reviews) I think it will really take off.

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  2. It always struck me, even before I started to pursue writing seriously, that a lot of people make a living on the backs of writers. Maybe the move to e-books will result in a little more power in the hands of the creators, which can’t be a bad thing.

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  3. Anne Devereux says:

    This is good, Peggy but you can’t style what Nyree Belleville did as self-publishing. She had already been professionally published, the rights had reverted to her, and she re-published by herself in e-format. Her book sales took off so well in large part because they had already been through the traditional publishing process: properly written in the first place, then professionally edited, proofed and marketed by her publisher. Of course now that she’s established herself as a successful professional author, she can just skip that process and self-publish.

    I think it’s important to emphasize that just because you’ve written a book, it’s not automatically going to generate huge sales if you “pop it online”.

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    • Peggy Blair says:

      All good points Anne. I think the article makes that point as well, that it’s the rare few that make it. But I do think that if you publish anything without an agent/publisher and take on all the tasks involved in it that it’s fair to say that it’s self-published, even if you already have published books through the conventional route. Seems to me that would be the smart way to go about it: to build a bit of a platform first and then go it alone. Building up a readership from scratch with all the white noise out there would be very hard. It would turn ordinary readers into literary agents, trying to find the gem in the slushpile that’s worth reading :-).

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  4. Thanks for posting this, Peggy. There is so much to learn about the process and the ever increasing demand for ebooks.

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  5. Pingback: Albert Berg’s A Prairie Home Apocalypse or: What the Dog Saw | Sonia G Medeiros is Doing the Write Thing

  6. Hi Peggy:
    Congratulations on on your publishing deal. I am a member of Capital Crime Writers and was in attendance at the Ottawa Public library when you sat on the panel with other published writers. I was very impressed with the number of agent rejections you suffered before acceptance. Personally, I only collected 75 before deciding that I would go the Indie publishing route.
    I have since included this site on my blogroll and the purpose of this correspondence is to request the inclusion of my blog on yours, that is, if you find it worthy.
    Thanks for your consideration,
    Terrence Carling

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  7. Hi Peggy:
    Thanks for putting me on your blogroll. I neglected to inform you that although my novel is called ‘When Truth Awakens’, the blog title is ‘Truth in Sentences’. My neglect. Also your blogroll refers to ‘Terence Corcoran’, a writer and columnist whose work I admire; it should read ‘Terrence Carling’. I point this out to you because while I don’t mind riding on Mr. Corcoran’s coattails, he may find mine a little threadbare.
    Thanks for the inclusion,
    Terrence Carling

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